Humanities - Undergraduate Programs

The Lester and Sally Entin Faculty of Humanities

  • General
  • Programs

Arabic and Islamic Studies (dm/sm)  (0631)

The Arabic and Islamic culture is rich and diverse. It is the culture of many great scientists, philosophers, authors and intellectuals who enriched important fields of human knowledge.

 

The Department of Arabic and Islamic Studies aims to provide students with theoretical and practical knowledge in classic Arabic and modern standard Arabic, to acquaint them with the Arabic and Islamic culture and Arabic literature, and to develop their ability to critically analyze literary texts, religious and historical texts, and grammatical texts from various periods and of various styles.

 

The department serves as a unique meeting point for Arabs and Jews, and for interfaith dialogues, regularly hosting a great number of gratis extra-curricular activities, including parties, movies, and trips to religious sites across the country.

 

The department offers two tracks for undergraduate students: Arabic language and literature, and Islamic studies.

 

Students may elect to study the two fields in a single-major track, or combine one of the fields with studies in another department in a double-major track.

 

Admissions

Admission is contingent on the Lester and Sally Entin Faculty of Humanities criteria.

 

Placement exams

Students seeking admission to either field of study are required to take a proficiency exam to assess their reading comprehension of literary Arabic texts.

 

The exams will be held on:

  • Wednesday, April 10, 2019 – Rosenberg Building room 209 at 09:00
  • Wednesday, June 19, 2019 – Gilman Building at 09:00
  • Wednesday, July 31, 2019 – Gilman Building at 09:00

 

Please check the bulletin board near room 150 in the Gilman Building on the morning of the exam for the room number.

 

Students with insufficient knowledge of Arabic will be required to complete a preparatory course in Arabic language, either during an intensive summer course, or during the first year of studies. Registration for summer courses, for which there is a separate fee, is through the department office.

 

Please visit the website of the department and the department facebook for additional details.

 

Archaeology and Ancient Near Eastern Cultures (dm/sm) (0671)

The Department of Archaeology and Ancient Near Eastern Cultures deals with the archaeology, history, languages, and religions of the ancient Near East from the Stone Age to the beginning of the Middle Ages. Undergraduate studies are designed to acquaint the student with the ancient civilizations of Israel, Syria, Egypt, Mesopotamia, Anatolia, the Aegean basin, and the Greek and Roman world. Special emphasis is placed on biblical archaeology.

 

Participation in field trips to archaeological sites, as well as in an archaeological excavation, is mandatory.

 

The department offers two fields of study: Archaeology of Israel and its surroundings, and Ancient Near Eastern Cultures.

 

Students may elect to study the two fields as a single-major program, or combine either of the tracks with studies in another department in a double-major program.

 

Admissions

Admission is contingent on the Lester and Sally Entin Faculty of Humanities criteria.

 

For additional information, please see the department’s website.

 

Biblical Studies (dm/sm) (0612)

The Department of Biblical Studies provides students with a broad basis in the field of biblical studies, covering various critical methodologies, including modern and post-modern approaches to biblical literature. The program aims to develop the students’ ability to study the Bible analytically and to understand the Hebrew Bible within the context of the ancient world and to appreciate its reception in subsequent ages, to present day. In addition to the close reading of biblical texts, courses are offered in the fields of textual criticism, biblical literature, theology and ideology, intertextuality (inner-biblical interpretation) Hebrew philology, and history of biblical interpretation (early, Rabbinic, Medieval, modern and post-modern).

 

Admissions

Admission is contingent on the Lester and Sally Entin Faculty of Humanities criteria.

 

For additional information, please see the department’s website.

  

Classics—Greece and Rome (dm/sm) (0672)

The Department of Classics offers a full program of courses in Greek and Latin language and literature, philosophy, art, and history.

 

Fields of study

Students may choose from three fields of study: Greek Language and Literature, Latin Language and Literature, and Classical Culture.

 

Greek Language and Literature

This field requires three years of Greek language studies and two years of Latin, as well as introductory courses in general subjects. Students are required to complete two proseminars and two seminars in Greek poetry and prose, and one proseminar course in Latin.

 

Latin Language and Literature

This field requires three years of Latin language studies and two years of Greek, as well as introductory courses in general subjects. Students are required to complete two proseminars and two seminars in Latin poetry and prose, and one proseminar in Greek.

 

Classical Culture

Students in this field are required to complete introductory courses in Greek and Latin literature in translation, including poetry, drama, history, and philosophy, as well as courses in mythology, art, and archaeology. Students are also required to complete three proseminars and two seminars on topics related to the literature, history, and philosophy of the Greek and Roman world.

 

Students may elect to study two fields as a single-major program, or to combine one field in the department with studies in another department in a double-major program.

 

Admissions

Admission is contingent on the Lester and Sally Entin Faculty of Humanities criteria.

 

For additional information, please see the department’s website.

 

East Asian Studies (dm) (0687)

The Department of East Asian Studies offers students the opportunity to extensively study Asian cultures, focusing on India, China, and Japan. The interdisciplinary approach studies the cultural elements of these Asian civilizations from the perspectives of history, religion, philosophy, anthropology, sociology, literature, the arts, and language. The department aims to provide students with the basic academic tools for further research, focusing on the unique viewpoints of Asian cultures.

 

The department also offers students the opportunity to acquire basic skills in the major languages of Asia: Sanskrit, Hindi, Chinese (classic and modern), and Japanese (classic and modern). Both reading and oral skills are promoted in the modern languages. 

 

Study Tracks

  • Double-major track: Based on a combined program from the East Asian Studies Department and another department.
  • Single-major track: Second year students may enroll in a single-major track, based on academic excellence. To enter the single-major track students must complete their first year of studies with a minimum average of 85 in their first year courses in the department (minimum grade of 85 in 2 introductory courses) and with a minimum average of 80 in 16 hours of course-work in their other studies.

 

Students wishing to transfer to the single-major track after their first year should submit a written request to the department Teaching Committee.

 

Admissions

Admission is contingent on the Lester and Sally Entin Faculty of Humanities criteria.

 

For additional information, please see the department’s website.

 

English and American Studies (dm/sm) (0626)

The program is designed to provide students with a scholarly knowledge of English and American literature and culture. Studies train students in the critical use of scholarly methods of literary study, accustom students to the independent study of cultural texts, and assist them in developing their ability to use the English language as an instrument for oral and written expression.

 

Applicants may be required to take an entrance exam, given by the department, in addition to other requirements (see below).  

 

The department offers three tracks:

  • English Literature (double major)—In this track students study English-language literature of different periods, locales, and genres from Shakespeare’s plays to postmodern American poetry. Students also take courses in literary theory and learn the craft of academic writing.
  • American Studies (double major)—This interdisciplinary track provides students with a broad understanding of North American society, culture and literature. Students take courses in the English department, in addition to relevant courses in history, film, political science, and media studies. This track can only be taken as one half of a double-major.
  • English Literature – Expanded Track (single major)—This option is meant for students with an outstanding academic record in their first year of studies. As of the second year, students study in a single major program in the Department of English and American Studies.

 

Admissions

  • A minimum grade of 85 in the 5-unit Israeli Matriculation English exam (or a minimum grade of 90 in English as a first foreign language in the old system of Israeli Matriculation) and a minimum grade of 134 in the English section of the psychometric exam (or a minimum grade of 234 on the AMIR exam).
  • Candidates who do not meet the psychometric/AMIR or the Matriculation requirements above may choose to take the English Department entrance exam, provided they meet one of the following requirements:
  1. A minimum grade of 134 in the English section of the psychometric exam (or a minimum grade of 234 on the AMIR exam) and a grade lower than 85 in the 5-unit Israeli Matriculation English exam or an Israeli Matriculation Exam of fewer than 5 units.
  2. A minimum grade of 85 in the 5-unit Israeli Matriculation English exam (or a minimum grade of 90 in English as a first foreign language in the old system of Israeli Matriculation) and a minimum grade of 120 in the English section of the psychometric exam (or a minimum grade of 220 on the AMIR exam) or currently enrolled in the Advanced II course given by the Division of Foreign Languages.
  3. Exemption achieved in the Advanced II course given by the Division of Foreign Languages at Tel Aviv University.
  4. A minimum grade of 600 on the verbal section of the SATs.
  5. A high school diploma from a country where the primary language of instruction is English. 

Entrance examinations will be held on the following dates:

Toward the first semester

  • Friday May 24, 2019
  • Wednesday August 7, 2019
  • Friday October 4, 2019

 

Toward the second semester (tentative)

  • Friday January 10, 2020
  • Monday February 24, 2020

 

Candidates may take the entrance exam only once towards each semester and no more than twice towards each academic year.

 

For additional information, please see the department website.

 

French Culture (0668)

The Program in French culture offers a wide range of interdisciplinary courses covering French History, French and Francophone Literature, the developments of the Arts in the French sphere, and the mastering of the French language. We accept Israeli students as well as immigrant students from French speaking countries and from all over the world.

  • For Israeli students, the department offers training and study programs that offer various professional and economical possibilities in the Franco-Israeli sphere and in French speaking countries.
  • For French-speaking immigrant students, the department is a home to those seeking to acclimatize to Israeli society while nurturing their cultural and linguistic legacy.

 

This program is offered as a double major. 

 

The program offers students a BA, after which it is possible to register at Tel Aviv University for a French Language Teaching License or/and for an MA degree (2 years).

 

The BA program includes 62 semester hours. The courses examine a range of issues related to French culture, history, and literature from medieval times to the 21th century, as well as French linguistics.

 

This program may lead to studies in translation, teaching, diplomacy, tourism, and other fields that use the French language.

 

Feel free to contact our BA advisor, Prof. Nadine Kuperty-Tsur, [kuperty@post.tau.ac.il].

 

Admissions

Admission is contingent on the Lester and Sally Entin Faculty of Humanities criteria.

 

For additional information, please see the department’s website.

 

Hebrew Language (0614) & Semitic Linguistics (0624) (dm) 

The Department of Hebrew Language and Semitic Linguistics offers two undergraduate degrees: Hebrew Language (0614) and Semitic Linguistics (0624).

 

The Department of Hebrew Language (0614) provides students with scholarly knowledge of the structure of the Hebrew language as it is manifested in various historical periods and styles, and introduces them to the problems and achievements of the Hebrew language, training them in up-to-date research methods of the various branches of linguistics. Studies are based on the comparison between Hebrew and cognate Semitic languages, and on the development of Hebrew, as well as the synchronic study of the various manifestations of Modern Hebrew. The studies aim at granting students basic knowledge of modern linguistic research methods in phonology, morphology, syntax, semantics, and pragmatics. The main subjects include: the development of the Hebrew language from biblical through rabbinical (xasal) Hebrew, medieval Hebrew, and Modern and Israeli Hebrew, the language of Hebrew literature, the science of language and its development, Hebrew morphology and phonology, Hebrew syntax and semantics, as well as the study of metaphor, discourse, and corpus linguistics.

 

The program of Semitic Linguistics (0624) provides students with both a basic knowledge of living and ancient languages, and an awareness of general research methodologies. The program aims to train students in the research of Semitic languages using modern linguistic tools of both synchronic and historical linguistics.

 

History (dm/sm) (0621)

The Department of History focuses on the history of Western Civilization. Courses are divided into four principal clusters: ancient history; medieval history; early-modern history; and modern history. The modern history cluster is divided into four geographical subdivisions (Western and Central Europe, Russia and Eastern Europe, North America, and Latin America).

 

Students may convert their double-major history studies to a single-major track at the end of the first year after achieving a minimum grade average of 85.

 

Admissions

Admission is contingent on the Lester and Sally Entin Faculty of Humanities criteria.

 

Please see the department website for additional details.
 

Jewish History (dm/sm) (0677)

The Department of Jewish History offers a wide range of courses in the history of the Jewish people in the Land of Israel and in the Diaspora.

 

Courses begin from the biblical era, when the distinctive culture of the nation of Israel began to take shape in the ancient Near East. Studies continue to the period of the Second Temple and Talmud and to the Middle Ages, when the prominence of the Jewish national center in the Land of Israel first rose and then declined, while new, influential centers of Jewish life grew in the Diaspora. Courses continue to scan the history of the Jews in the Land of Israel under frequently changing rulers, while Diaspora Jews reached all corners of the known world, molding the historical image of the Jewish people until modern times.

 

The department provides students with the critical tools and the intellectual perspective necessary to understand events and historical processes, ideological movements and spiritual achievements from the dawn of man to the present.

 

Admissions

Admission to all fields of study is contingent on the Lester and Sally Entin Faculty of Humanities criteria.

 

For additional information, please see the department’s website.

 

The Inter-Disciplinary Program in Israel Studies (Track 180) (dm)

The Department of Jewish History offers an Inter-Disciplinary Program in Israel Studies. The goal of this BA program is to grant students a multi-faceted approach to the many aspects of Israeli society and to expose the multiple layers that together create a dynamic society within the context of the Middle East, the Jewish world, and an increasingly global society. The academic basis of the program is historical, and students are exposed to approaches and methods from a variety of disciplines in the humanities, social sciences, arts, and other fields.

 

Study tracks

Undergraduate students are offered two different programs.

  • Double-major track: Based on a program combining two different majors, one of which must be either Jewish History or Israel Studies, while the other may be from any other department in the university.
  • Single-major track: Second year students who have completed their first year of studies with an average grade of 85 in the Department of Jewish History and an average grade of 80 in their other department of study may enroll in a single-major program. Students wishing to transfer to the single-major track after their first year should submit a written request to the department Teaching Committee.

 

Admissions

Admission to all fields of study is contingent on the Lester and Sally Entin Faculty of Humanities criteria.

 

For additional information please see the program’s website.

 

Jewish Philosophy (0616) & Talmud (0683) (dm)

The Department of Jewish Philosophy & Talmud offers two undergraduate degrees: Jewish Philosophy (0616) & Talmud (0683).

 

Students are expected to major in two of the following three areas:

  • Rabbinic Thought, Talmud, and Ancient Jewish Literature—The program focuses on the classics of Jewish Law and Jewish Thought in the formative periods of the Mishnah and the Talmud. The program offers two fields of study (one emphasizing Talmud, the other emphasizing Second Temple thought) to accommodate the different interests of students studying this period in Jewish history and literature. The program aims to provide the skills required for independent and critical study of the classical sources of Talmudic literature, both legal and aggadic material, as well as the compositions of the Gaonic and Rabbinic periods. (Special areas of advanced studies include Geniza research.) Students interested in earning their undergraduate degree in the Talmud program (0683) should refer to the Hebrew information booklet or the department internet site.
  • Medieval Jewish Philosophy and  Kabbalah—The program covers the study of the major trends of medieval Jewish thought. In the field of medieval Jewish mysticism the program covers the background of Kabbalah in early Jewish Mysticism, the rise and development of the medieval Kabbalah in the Book of Zohar and other classic sources, ecstatic Kabbalah and the development of 16th C Kabbalah of Safed and its influence on Judaism. In the field of medieval Jewish philosophy the program covers Medieval Jewish Philosophy (9th-16th centuries), its major trends such as Jewish Kalam, Jewish Neo-Platonism, Yehuda Halevy, Maimonides, and Jewish Averroesim. Both trends of medieval Jewish thought are studied in their broader Muslim and Christian contexts.
  • Modern Jewish Philosophy and Hasidism—The program covers pre-modern and modern trends of Jewish thought including the emergence of Sabbateanism, Hasidism, and other modern forms of Jewish mysticism, including contemporary pre-modern philosophy, spanning from Spinoza to contemporary Jewish and Israeli thought. The emphasis is on classics such as Hermann Cohen, Franz Rosenzweig, Emmanuel Levinas, as well as other modern Jewish thinkers.

 

Admissions

Admission to all fields of study is contingent on the Lester and Sally Entin Faculty of Humanities criteria.

 

For additional information, please see the department’s website.

 

Linguistics (dm/sm) (0627)

The Department of Linguistics offers an undergraduate program that focuses on theories of natural (human) language, with an emphasis on explanatory accounts for native speakers' linguistic knowledge. We hold the fundamental assumption that the computational system of language knowledge is governed by universal principles, manifested in a wide variety of linguistic phenomena found in genetically unrelated languages. Fields of study include: phonetics, phonology, morphology, generative syntax, formal semantics, pragmatics, neurolinguistics, psycholinguistics, language acquisition, and computational linguistics.

 

The study of linguistics promotes analytical thinking and problem solving, allowing students to pursue diverse career tracks. The department trains students for an academic career in linguistics and provides crucial knowledge for students intending to specialize in professions related to language, such as artificial intelligence, communication, clinical aspects of language (language and communication disorders), language teaching, literature, translation, etc.

 

Study tracks

The Department of Linguistics offers the following study tracks.

  • Double-major track–A combination of Linguistics and another department in the university
  • Single-major track–Open to second year students (subject to approval) with an outstanding first year academic record.
  • Double-major Computational Linguistics–A structured combination of Linguistics and Computer Science
  • A Biology and Linguistics track with an emphasis on brain sciences, within the Sagol School of Neuroscience
  • New program! Double major in psycholinguistics—a structured combination of Linguistics and Psychology. 

 

 

The professional literature is written in English. Some of the courses are taught in English.

 

 

 

Admissions

Admission is contingent on the Lester and Sally Entin Faculty of Humanities criteria.

 

For additional information, please see the department’s website.

 

Literature Department (dm/sm) (0680)

Poetics (Theory of Literature), Hebrew Literature, Comparative Literature, Creative Writing, and Translation.

 

The various fields of study offered provide a comprehensive selection of courses in literary theories; Hebrew literature and culture throughout history, focusing on the modern period, particularly contemporary Israeli literature; and major trends, genres and exemplary works of world literature. Students develop interpretative, analytical, and critical skills regarding literary texts. The writing fields develop creative writing skills, and literary translating proficiency.

 

Fields of study

The curriculum of the Literature Department includes (1) core courses, required for all tracks; and (2) an elected field of study.

 

Core courses for all fields include: Introduction to Narrative; Introduction to Poetry; Introduction to Literary Theory; Introduction to Modern Hebrew Literature; and Western World Masterpieces. 

 

Two tracks are offered:

  1. Hebrew Literature and Poetics & Comparative Literature
  2. Professional Literary Writing–one of two clusters:
  • Creative Writing
  • Literary Translation

 

Candidates whose high school education was not in Hebrew must attain exemption level in the Hebrew Proficiency exam before beginning their studies.

 

Admissions

Admission is contingent on the Lester and Sally Entin Faculty of Humanities criteria.

 

For additional information, please see the department’s website.

 

Program for Judeo-Arabic Culture Studies (dm) (1681)

The program of Judeo-Arabic Culture Studies offers students the opportunity to acquire theoretical and practical knowledge of classical and modern literary Arabic and classical and modern Judeo-Arabic culture. Students also acquire knowledge in the culture and literature of the Jews of the Arab world in the middle ages and the modern period, and of Mizrahim in Israel, in Hebrew and Arabic (Judeo-Arabic and Literary Arabic), in Poetry, Prose, Philosophy, religious law, and so on, and its historical context.

 

The Inter-University BA Program Judeo-Arabic Culture Studies is a new and innovative academic venture. The program is located at Tel Aviv University but enjoys full collaboration with Ben-Gurion University of the Negev. After registering for the program at TAU, students are encouraged to take courses in the Ben-Gurion University of the Negev, thus allowing for a wide selection of courses. The combining of resources from the two universities has enabled us to establish this program in Judeo-Arabic Culture Studies, with courses in literature, philosophy, linguistics and history. The degree is granted by TAU.

 

Admissions

Admission is contingent on the Lester and Sally Entin Faculty of Humanities criteria.

 

Placement exams

Students are not required to know Arabic before starting the program. Those who lack sufficient proficiency may complete Arabic language requirements during the first two years of the program.

 

Please see the Hebrew website of the program for additional details.

 

 

Middle Eastern and African History (dm/sm) (0622)

The Department of Middle Eastern and African History offers a variety of courses dealing with the political, social, and cultural history of the Middle East from North Africa to Iran, including the Arabic- but also the Turkish- and Persian-speaking regions. The period covered is from the advent of Islam onwards, with a special emphasis on the modern history of the Middle East. African Studies are offered by the department as an independent program (please refer to program 0693 below). The program aims to acquaint students with the cultures, socio-political structures, and languages of these regions.   

Study tracks

The department offers two study tracks.

  • Double-major track: Based on a combined program from the Department of Middle Eastern and African History and another department.
  • Single-major track: Second year students who have achieved a minimum average grade of 90 in 30 credit hours in their first year of studies. The departmental academic committee may consider other candidates based on interviews and special circumstances.

 

Various scholarships are offered to department students.

 

Admissions

Admission is contingent on the Lester and Sally Entin Faculty of Humanities criteria.

 

See the department website for additional details.

 

African Studies (dm) (0693)

The Inter-University BA Program in African Studies is a new and innovative academic venture. The program is located at Tel Aviv University but enjoys full collaboration with Ben-Gurion University of the Negev and the Open University of Israel. After registering for the program at TAU, students are encouraged to take courses from all three universities, thus allowing for a wide selection of disciplines and experts from different fields. The combining of resources from three universities has enabled us to establish a truly world-class program in African Studies, offering courses in history, anthropology, literature, political science, sociology, linguistics, tourism, and art history. Graduates will receive a BA in African Studies granted by Tel Aviv Univeristy.

 

For additional information, please see the department’s website.

 

Multidisciplinary Program in the Humanities (dm) (0662)

This multidisciplinary undergraduate program offers students the opportunity to earn a double-major BA degree based on a broad range of course clusters offered by the Faculty of Humanities and other faculties. Some of the clusters in this curriculum are Psychology and Psychoanalysis, Digital Culture, Management and Economic Thought, Women and Gender Studies, Social Justice, Environment and Ecology, Child Culture, and Rhetoric. 

 

Students in the General and Interdisciplinary Studies program are afforded the opportunity to plan an individual curriculum of studies.

 

Study tracks

This double-major study program is to be combined with another double-major program.

 

Admissions

Admission is contingent on the Lester and Sally Entin Faculty of Humanities criteria.

 

For additional information, please see the department’s website.

 

Philosophy (dm/sm) (0618)

The Department of Philosophy introduces students to basic concepts, to a range of methodologies, and areas of philosophy.

 

Study tracks

  • Double-major track: combines a program in Philosophy with a program in another department.
  • Single-major track: Second year students who have completed their first year with a minimum  average grade of 90 in the department and a minimum average grade of 85 in their other department may enroll in a single-major program. Students wishing to move to the single-major track after their first year should submit a written request to the department Teaching Committee.
  • New unique track in Consciousness and Cognition, combining studies in Philosophy and in Psychology.

 

The curriculum for all study-tracks is composed of different sections

Section A: Introductory courses (mandatory):

  • Introduction to Greek Philosophy
  • Introduction to Modern Philosophy
  • Introduction to 19th C Philosophy
  • Introduction to Logic
  • Readings in Philosophical Texts

 

Section B: Introductory, advanced courses and seminars in areas of philosophy (elective):

  • Epistemology and Metaphysics
  • Philosophy of Language and Logic
  • Moral and Political Philosophy
  • Aesthetics and the Philosophy of Art
  • Philosophy of Religion
  • Eastern Philosophy
  • Philosophy of Science

 

Admissions

Admission is contingent on the Lester and Sally Entin Faculty of Humanities criteria.

 

For additional information, please see the department’s website.

 

Philosophy, Economics, Political Science (0651)

The Philosophy, Economics, Political Science program focuses on disciplines relating to affairs of state and government. Understanding social and political phenomena as well as issues in public policy involve considerations from a variety of disciplines. Economic policy involves moral considerations and carries social implications. Principles of justice support certain institutional structures that shape the economic agenda. These are anchored in law, and applied by the legal and political institutions. The goal of the program is to impart knowledge and analytic tools in these fields and to fully comprehend the relationships between them.

 

The program is open to students with an outstanding academic record who are interested in researching these fields, as well as students seeking employment in public service.

 

For additional information, please contact the department.

 

Women and Gender Studies Program (0608)

Tel Aviv University is the only university in Israel that offers a BA in Women and Gender Studies. The multi-disciplinary degree offers courses from four faculties: Humanities, Social Sciences, Law, and Arts.

 

The program lays the foundation for a critical examination of the construction of gender within society. Feminist theories and gender studies are based on the understanding that the “feminine” and “masculine” are not only the outcome of biological differences, but rather the consequence of changing social, political, legal, and cultural structures, and ideologies. The Women and Gender Studies Program aims to give students theoretical and methodological tools for scientific, critical, activist, and creative thinking in a variety of fields of study related to gender: history, sociology, arts, politics, literature, psychology, law, film, etc. It offers an analysis of the role of gender as a critical category and the place of women in culture and society, with a focus on the links between gender, class, race, ethnicity, sexuality, nationalism, and globalization. The curriculum introduces students to a broad basis of feminist theories, both in their own right and as they affect related fields of study.

 

Fields of study

This program is offered as one of a double major. 

 

Students participate in mandatory core courses and choose from four study tracks: Humanities, Social Science, Art, and Law. A wide choice of elective courses are offered from associated departments: History, Art History, Sociology & Anthropology, Philosophy, Cultural Studies, Law, Literature, English and American Studies, and many more.

 

Admissions

Please contact the department regarding admission requirements.

 

Scholarships

The National Council of Jewish Women (USA) offers several scholarships, in addition to scholarships based on excellence offered by the Program. Conditions for submitting applications for scholarships can be viewed on the Program’s website.

 

The detailed curriculum, together with additional information, appears on the website of The NCJW Women and Gender Studies Program.

 

International Program in Liberal Arts (1662)

This multidisciplinary Liberal Arts program focuses on the humanities and social sciences. This three-year course of study provides students with a strong liberal arts education while empowering them to succeed in an increasingly complex and fast-changing world.

 

The program combines exposure to a broad range of disciplines with an in-depth study of at least one academic field. It aims to provide students with a variety of analytical tools; to develop their intellectual agility, critical thinking skills, and creative power; and to equip them with the ethical sensibilities necessary for living in today’s complex societies.

 

The program is designed to motivate students to explore beyond the confines of single disciplines, by offering a broad selection of courses in various fields of the Humanities and Social Sciences. Alongside the core liberal arts curriculum and electives in a variety of topics, students choose a major and a minor in Middle Eastern studies, Philosophy, Literature, Israel and Jewish Studies, Psychology and Psychoanalysis, or Communication and Digital Culture.

 

In addition to coursework, students in this program enjoy study trips throughout Israel that deepen their understanding of local and international topics, and participate in numerous cultural events, seminars, and lectures arranged on campus each semester. Students benefit from an invaluable intercultural dialogue and communication experience with like-minded peers from a kaleidoscope of backgrounds.

 

Admissions

The program accepts a variety of international certificates and diplomas. For country-specific information, please contact the program administration directly

 

For more information regarding the International Program, please visit the program's website.

Tel Aviv University, P.O. Box 39040, Tel Aviv 6997801, Israel
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